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Clin Chim Acta. 1989 Jun 30;182(2):123-9.

The effect of hypoalbuminaemia, hyperbilirubinaemia and renal failure on serum fructosamine concentration in non-diabetic individuals.

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1
Department of Pathological Biochemistry, Western Infirmary, Glasgow, Scotland.

Abstract

We have investigated the effects of hypoalbuminaemia, hyperbilirubinaemia and renal failure on serum fructosamine concentration in 39 non-diabetic patients. All patients were hypoalbuminaemic (median serum albumin 25 g/l, range 12-34 g/l). Group 1 (n = 19) were patients with hypoalbuminaemia alone, group 2 (n = 7) with hypoalbuminaemia and impaired renal function (median serum creatinine 226 mumol/l, range 154-461 mumol/l) and group 3 (n = 13) were subjects with hypoalbuminaemia and hyperbilirubinaemia (median serum bilirubin 34 mumol/l, range 19-83 mumol/l). Serum fructosamine was significantly lower in all three groups compared to age-matched normoalbuminaemic controls, but there was no significant difference in fructosamine concentrations between the groups. There was a correlation between fructosamine concentration and serum albumin. (r = 0.82, p less than 0.001) in all three groups combined. Serum fructosamine did correlate with serum bilirubin in patients with normal renal function (r = 0.0, p less than 0.001). In patients with abnormal renal function there was no correlation between serum fructosamine and either urea (r = 0.22, ns) or creatinine (r = 0.31, ns). Albumin is the major factor affecting serum fructosamine concentrations. Moderate hyperbilirubinaemia does not affect fructosamine concentration. No difference in fructosamine concentration could be demonstrated in patients with renal failure.

PMID:
2776348
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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