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Hum Factors. 2017 Mar;59(2):289-298. doi: 10.1177/0018720816671605. Epub 2016 Oct 20.

Effects of Rest-Break Intention on Rest-Break Frequency and Work-Related Fatigue.

Author information

1
Medical University of Vienna, Austria.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The present paper presents findings from two studies addressing the effects of the employee's intention to have rest breaks on rest-break frequency and the change of well-being during a workday.

BACKGROUND:

Rest breaks are effective in avoiding an accumulation of fatigue during work. However, little is known about individual differences in rest-break behavior.

METHOD:

In Study 1, the association between rest-break intention and the daily number of rest breaks recorded over 4 consecutive workdays was determined by generalized linear model in a sample of employees ( n = 111, 59% females). In Study 2, professional geriatric nurses ( n = 95 females) who worked over two consecutive 12-hour day shifts recorded well-being (fatigue, distress, effort motivation) at the beginning and the end of their shifts. The effect of rest-break intention on the change of well-being was determined by multilevel modeling.

RESULTS:

Rest-break intention was positively associated with the frequency of rest breaks (Study 1) and reduced the increase of fatigue and distress over the workday (Study 2).

CONCLUSION:

The results indicate that individual differences account for the number of breaks an employee takes and, as a consequence, for variations in the work-related fatigue and distress.

APPLICATION:

Strengthening rest-break intentions may help to increase rest-break behavior to avoid the buildup of fatigue and distress over a workday.

KEYWORDS:

distress; individual differences; intention; recovery from work; rest breaks

PMID:
27760865
DOI:
10.1177/0018720816671605
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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