Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Genome Biol. 2016 Oct 19;17(1):217.

Tiny microbes, enormous impacts: what matters in gut microbiome studies?

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
2
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA.
3
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
4
Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. robknight@ucsd.edu.
5
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. robknight@ucsd.edu.

Abstract

Many factors affect the microbiomes of humans, mice, and other mammals, but substantial challenges remain in determining which of these factors are of practical importance. Considering the relative effect sizes of both biological and technical covariates can help improve study design and the quality of biological conclusions. Care must be taken to avoid technical bias that can lead to incorrect biological conclusions. The presentation of quantitative effect sizes in addition to P values will improve our ability to perform meta-analysis and to evaluate potentially relevant biological effects. A better consideration of effect size and statistical power will lead to more robust biological conclusions in microbiome studies.

PMID:
27760558
PMCID:
PMC5072314
DOI:
10.1186/s13059-016-1086-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center