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Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Cell Biol Lipids. 2017 Nov;1862(11):1451-1460. doi: 10.1016/j.bbalip.2016.10.006. Epub 2016 Oct 17.

Lipopolysaccharide biogenesis and transport at the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.

Author information

1
Dipartimento di Scienze Farmacologiche e Biomolecolari, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: paola.sperandeo@unimi.it.
2
Dipartimento di Biotecnologie e Bioscienze, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy.
3
Dipartimento di Scienze Farmacologiche e Biomolecolari, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: alessandra.polissi@unimi.it.

Abstract

The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is an asymmetric lipid bilayer containing a unique glycolipid, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in its outer leaflet. LPS molecules confer to the OM peculiar permeability barrier properties enabling Gram-negative bacteria to exclude many toxic compounds, including clinically useful antibiotics, and to survive harsh environments. Transport of LPS poses several problems to the cells due to the amphipatic nature of this molecule. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the LPS transport machinery, discuss the challenges associated with this process and present the solutions that bacterial cells have evolved to address the problem of LPS transport and assembly at the cell surface. Finally, we discuss how knowledge on LPS biogenesis can be translated for the development of novel antimicrobial therapies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Lipids edited by Russell E. Bishop.

KEYWORDS:

ABC transporter; Drug discovery; Lipopolysaccharide transport; Outer membrane biogenesis; Sensing LPS defects

PMID:
27760389
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbalip.2016.10.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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