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Cell Rep. 2016 Oct 18;17(4):977-986. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.09.059.

Cohesin Removal along the Chromosome Arms during the First Meiotic Division Depends on a NEK1-PP1γ-WAPL Axis in the Mouse.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Sciences and Center for Reproductive Genomics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.
2
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.
3
Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Laboratory of Chromosomal Dynamics in Meiosis, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas (CSIC), Madrid 28040, Spain.
4
Department of Biomedical Sciences and Center for Reproductive Genomics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. Electronic address: paula.cohen@cornell.edu.
5
Department of Biomedical Sciences and Center for Reproductive Genomics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. Electronic address: jkh44@cornell.edu.

Abstract

Mammalian NIMA-like kinase-1 (NEK1) is a dual-specificity kinase highly expressed in mouse germ cells during prophase I of meiosis. Loss of NEK1 induces retention of cohesin on chromosomes at meiotic prophase I. Timely deposition and removal of cohesin is essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Two processes regulate cohesin removal: a non-proteolytic mechanism involving WAPL, sororin, and PDS5B and direct cleavage by separase. Here, we demonstrate a role for NEK1 in the regulation of WAPL loading during meiotic prophase I, via an interaction between NEK1 and PDS5B. This regulation of WAPL by NEK1-PDS5B is mediated by protein phosphatase 1 gamma (PP1γ), which both interacts with and is a phosphotarget of NEK1. Taken together, our results reveal that NEK1 phosphorylates PP1γ, leading to the dephosphorylation of WAPL, which, in turn, results in its retention on chromosome cores to promote loss of cohesion at the end of prophase I in mammals.

KEYWORDS:

NIMA-like kinase; WAPL; cohesin; meiosis; mouse; prophase pathway

PMID:
27760328
PMCID:
PMC5123770
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2016.09.059
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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