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J Clin Neurosci. 2017 Jan;35:47-49. doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2016.09.018. Epub 2016 Oct 15.

Transforming growth factor-β1 in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with distinct neurodegenerative diseases.

Author information

1
Department of Neurobiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577, Japan; Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575, Japan.
2
Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575, Japan.
3
Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577, Japan.
4
Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575, Japan. Electronic address: kazishii@md.tsukuba.ac.jp.

Abstract

A chronic inflammatory condition may underlie neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). For example, both PD and AD patients show an increase in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) levels in their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). TGF-β1 is a cytokine that inhibits inflammation. In the present study, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we tested the hypothesis that the level of TGF-β1 in the CSF of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD), or multiple system atrophy-cerebellar subtype (MSA-C) would be elevated compared with that of normal controls. We found that TGF-β1 levels in the CSF were not significantly different between these patients and normal controls. Our data suggest that the level of TGF-β1 in the CSF is an unreliable biomarker of ALS, SCD, and MSA-C.

KEYWORDS:

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Cerebrospinal fluid; Multiple system atrophy; Neurodegenerative disease; Spinocerebellar degeneration; Transforming growth factor-β1

PMID:
27756506
DOI:
10.1016/j.jocn.2016.09.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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