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Curr Opin Pediatr. 2016 Dec;28(6):786-793.

Community-acquired pneumonia in the post 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era.

Author information

1
aDivision of Hospital Medicine bDivision of Critical Care cDivision of Infectious Disease, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

This review covers the outpatient management of pediatric community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), discussing the changing microbiology of CAP since the introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in 2010, and providing an overview of national guideline recommendations for diagnostic evaluation and treatment.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Rates of invasive pneumococcal disease and pneumococcal antibiotic resistance have plummeted since widespread 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine immunization. Viruses remain the most common cause of CAP in young children; children over age 5 years have increased rates of Mycoplasma pneumoniae. A recent national guideline offers recommendations for office-based diagnostic evaluation and treatment of pediatric CAP.

SUMMARY:

This review offers a discussion of the above findings with practical recommendations for the office-based practitioner in the evaluation and treatment of an infant (>3 months) or child with suspected CAP.

PMID:
27755118
DOI:
10.1097/MOP.0000000000000428
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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