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J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Nov 1;29(11):1293-1297. doi: 10.1515/jpem-2016-0171.

Prevalence of medically treated children with ADHD and type 1 diabetes in Germany - Analysis of two representative databases.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in Germany.

METHODS:

Two different representative German databases - IMSĀ®-Disease Analyzer, a database that includes diagnoses as well as other information, and IMSĀ®-LRx, a database that documents prescriptions - were used to conduct a retrospective analysis. We searched the LRx database for patients who received both insulin and ADHD-specific medication.

RESULTS:

In 2014, 677,587 children and adolescents aged 0-18 years were treated by a pediatrician and documented in the Disease Analyzer database. Of these patients, 16,833 received the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) diagnosis of ADHD (2.5%) and 3668 patients were treated for T1DM (0.1%). Of these 3668 patients, a total of 153 children were also diagnosed with ADHD (4.2%; p<0.05). In the LRx database, the overall prevalence of children in Germany who received both drugs for the treatment of ADHD and insulin in 2014 amounted to 2.9%. Diagnosis of ADHD is 2.4-3.3 times more frequent in boys than in girls. The highest prevalence was seen in the age group of 12-15 years (3.5%) and the lowest in the age group of 6-11 years (2.5%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Children with diabetes suffer from ADHD significantly more frequently than children without diabetes. The prevalence of medically treated children with ADHD and diabetes is similar to that documented in a recent report by the Barmer GEK health insurance body. However, it is possible that children with T1DM are much more frequently seen by medical care providers and are thus more likely to be evaluated and receive an appropriate diagnosis.

PMID:
27754966
DOI:
10.1515/jpem-2016-0171
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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