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Laryngoscope. 2017 Feb;127(2):E55-E61. doi: 10.1002/lary.26344. Epub 2016 Oct 18.

Longitudinal analysis of inflammatory biomarkers during acute rhinosinusitis.

Author information

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
2
PEDEGO Research Unit, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
3
Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu.
4
Air Force Command Finland, Finnish Defense Forces, Tikkakoski, Finland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To illuminate the pathophysiology of acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) with sequential monitoring of inflammatory biomarkers during an ARS episode and to clarify their diagnostic usability in bacterial ARS.

STUDY DESIGN:

Inception cohort study with 50 conscripts with ARS.

METHODS:

We collected peripheral blood high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), white blood cell (WBC), procalcitonin, and nasal nitric oxide (nNO) counts at 2 to 3 and 9 to 10 days of symptoms during an ARS episode. We simultaneously gathered various clinical parameters and microbiological samples. Bacterial ARS was confirmed with a positive culture of sinus aspirate.

RESULTS:

Reciprocal correlations and a significant change in biomarker levels between the two visits suggest that ARS involves a local and systemic inflammatory response that was strongest at 2 to 3 days. High-sensitive CRP and nNO reflected responses best (52% had increased CRP levels at 2-3 days; 66% had decreased nNO levels). White blood cell and procalcitonin counts rarely exceeded the reference range. Increased local and systemic inflammatory response were linked to multiple, adenoviral, or influenza A viral etiology or the detection of bacterial ARS. Local response correlated with imaging findings of wide paranasal sinus involvement and ostiomeatal complex occlusion. At 9 to 10 days, elevated (≥ 11 mg/L) and moderately elevated (≥ 49 mg/L) hs-CRP predicted bacterial ARS well (likelihood ratio [LR]+ 3.3 and LR+ 15.8, respectively), but the sensitivity for both findings remained low.

CONCLUSION:

Acute rhinosinusitis (particularly bacterial ARS) involves a local and systemic inflammatory response that is strongest at the beginning of symptoms. Elevated hs-CRP supports the diagnosis of bacterial ARS.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

4. Laryngoscope, 2016 127:E55-E61, 2017.

KEYWORDS:

Acute rhinosinusitis; C-reactive protein; CRP; NO; bacterial; high-sensitive CRP; nasal nitric oxide; procalcitonin

PMID:
27753120
DOI:
10.1002/lary.26344
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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