Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetologia. 2016 Dec;59(12):2527-2545. Epub 2016 Oct 17.

Physical activity and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

Author information

1
Health Behaviour Research Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, 1-19 Torrington Place, London, WC1E 6BT, UK. andrea.smith.14@ucl.ac.uk.
2
Institute of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. andrea.smith.14@ucl.ac.uk.
3
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
4
UKCRC Centre for Diet and Activity Research (CEDAR), University of Cambridge, Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge, UK.
5
MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge, UK.

Abstract

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS:

Inverse associations between physical activity (PA) and type 2 diabetes mellitus are well known. However, the shape of the dose-response relationship is still uncertain. This review synthesises results from longitudinal studies in general populations and uses non-linear models of the association between PA and incident type 2 diabetes.

METHODS:

A systematic literature search identified 28 prospective studies on leisure-time PA (LTPA) or total PA and risk of type 2 diabetes. PA exposures were converted into metabolic equivalent of task (MET) h/week and marginal MET (MMET) h/week, a measure only considering energy expended above resting metabolic rate. Restricted cubic splines were used to model the exposure-disease relationship.

RESULTS:

Our results suggest an overall non-linear relationship; using the cubic spline model we found a risk reduction of 26% (95% CI 20%, 31%) for type 2 diabetes among those who achieved 11.25 MET h/week (equivalent to 150 min/week of moderate activity) relative to inactive individuals. Achieving twice this amount of PA was associated with a risk reduction of 36% (95% CI 27%, 46%), with further reductions at higher doses (60 MET h/week, risk reduction of 53%). Results for the MMET h/week dose-response curve were similar for moderate intensity PA, but benefits were greater for higher intensity PA and smaller for lower intensity activity.

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION:

Higher levels of LTPA were associated with substantially lower incidence of type 2 diabetes in the general population. The relationship between LTPA and type 2 diabetes was curvilinear; the greatest relative benefits are achieved at low levels of activity, but additional benefits can be realised at exposures considerably higher than those prescribed by public health recommendations.

KEYWORDS:

Cohort studies; Dose–response; Meta-analysis; Physical activity; Systematic review; Type 2 diabetes

PMID:
27747395
PMCID:
PMC6207340
DOI:
10.1007/s00125-016-4079-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center