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Neuron. 2016 Nov 23;92(4):902-915. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2016.09.023. Epub 2016 Oct 13.

Distinct Roles of Parvalbumin- and Somatostatin-Expressing Interneurons in Working Memory.

Author information

1
Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141, Korea.
2
Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141, Korea.
3
Center for Synaptic Brain Dysfunctions, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon 34141, Korea.
4
Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141, Korea; Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141, Korea; Center for Synaptic Brain Dysfunctions, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon 34141, Korea. Electronic address: mwjung@kaist.ac.kr.

Abstract

Inhibitory interneurons are thought to play crucial roles in diverse brain functions. However, roles of different inhibitory interneuron subtypes in working memory remain unclear. We found distinct activity patterns and stimulation effects of two major interneuron subtypes, parvalbumin (PV)- and somatostatin (SOM)-expressing interneurons, in the medial prefrontal cortex of mice performing a spatial working memory task. PV interneurons showed weak target-dependent delay-period activity and were strongly inhibited by reward. By contrast, SOM interneurons showed strong target-dependent delay-period activity, and only a subtype of them was inhibited by reward. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of PV and SOM interneurons preferentially suppressed discharges of putative pyramidal cells and interneurons, respectively. These results indicate different contributions of PV and SOM interneurons to prefrontal cortical circuit dynamics underlying working memory.

KEYWORDS:

animal; interneuron; mice; optogenetics; parvalbumin; physiology; prefrontal cortex; reward; somatostatin; working memory

PMID:
27746132
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2016.09.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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