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Sci Total Environ. 2017 Jan 1;575:231-246. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.10.041. Epub 2016 Oct 12.

Silver nanoparticles in the environment: Sources, detection and ecotoxicology.

Author information

1
Antimicrobial Resistance and Microbial Ecology Group, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland; Centre for Health from Environment, Ryan Institute, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland. Electronic address: EOIN.MCGILLICUDDY@nuigalway.ie.
2
Bioscience Research Institute, Athlone Institute of Technology, Dublin Road, Athlone, Co. Westmeath, Ireland.
3
Antimicrobial Resistance and Microbial Ecology Group, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland; Centre for Health from Environment, Ryan Institute, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland.
4
Earth and Ocean Sciences, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland.
5
Bioscience Research Institute, Athlone Institute of Technology, Dublin Road, Athlone, Co. Westmeath, Ireland; Department of Life & Physical Science, Athlone Institute of Technology, Dublin Road, Athlone, Co. Westmeath, Ireland.
6
Discipline of Anatomy, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland.
7
Centre for Health from Environment, Ryan Institute, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland.

Abstract

The environmental impact of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) has become a topic of interest recently, this is due to the fact that AgNPs have been included in numerous consumer products including textiles, medical products, domestic appliances, food containers, cosmetics, paints and nano-functionalised plastics. The production, use and disposal of these AgNP containing products are potential routes for environmental exposure. These concerns have led to a number of studies investigating the release of particles from nano-functionalised products, the detection of the particles in the aquatic environment and the potential environmental toxicology of these AgNPs to aquatic organisms. The overall aim of this review is to examine methods for the capture and detection of AgNPs, potential toxicity and transmission routes in the aquatic environment.

KEYWORDS:

Chemical analysis; Engineered nanomaterials; Environmental fate; Environmental risk; Environmental toxicology; Silver nanoparticles

PMID:
27744152
DOI:
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.10.041
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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