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Bone. 2017 Mar;96:85-90. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2016.10.011. Epub 2016 Oct 12.

Serum sclerostin decreases following 12months of resistance- or jump-training in men with low bone mass.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, United States. Electronic address: hintonp@missouri.edu.
2
Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, United States.
3
Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, United States; Internal Medicine - Division of GI and Hepatology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, United States.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We previously reported that 12months of resistance training (RT, 2×/wk, N=19) or jump training (JUMP, 3×/wk, N=19) increased whole body and lumbar spine BMD and increased serum bone formation markers relative to resorption in physically active (≥4h/wk) men (mean age: 44±2y; median: 44y) with osteopenia of the hip or spine. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to examine the effects of the RT or JUMP intervention on potential endocrine mediators of the exercise effects on bone, specifically IGF-I, PTH and sclerostin.

METHODS:

Fasting blood samples were collected after a 24-h period of no exercise at baseline and after 12months of RT or JUMP. IGF-I, PTH and sclerostin were measured in serum by ELISA. The effects of RT or JUMP on IGF-I, PTH and sclerostin were evaluated using 2×2 repeated measures ANOVA (time, group). This study was conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and was approved by the University of Missouri IRB.

RESULTS:

Sclerostin concentrations in serum significantly decreased and IGF-I significantly increased after 12months of RT or JUMP; while PTH remained unchanged.

CONCLUSION:

The beneficial effects of long-term, progressive-intensity RT or JUMP on BMD in moderately active men with low bone mass are associated with decreased sclerostin and increased IGF-I.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise intervention; IGF-I; Male osteopenia; PTH; Sclerostin

PMID:
27744012
PMCID:
PMC5328803
DOI:
10.1016/j.bone.2016.10.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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