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Ethn Health. 2017 Dec;22(6):585-595. doi: 10.1080/13557858.2016.1244744. Epub 2016 Oct 14.

Rotavirus vaccination rate disparities seen among infants with acute gastroenteritis in Georgia.

Author information

1
a Departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology/Biochemistry/Immunology , Morehouse School of Medicine , Atlanta , GA , USA.
2
f Postgraduate Medical Institute Clinical Trials Unit , Anglia Ruskin University , Chelmsford , UK.
3
b Pediatric Emergency Medicine Associates , Atlanta , GA , USA.
4
c Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics , Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University , Atlanta , GA , USA.
5
e Children's Healthcare of Atlanta , Atlanta , GA , USA.
6
d Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine , Emory University , Atlanta , GA , USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Rotavirus (RV) is one of the most common diarrheal diseases affecting children less than 5 years of age. RV vaccines have greatly reduced this burden in the United States. The purpose of this study was to determine possible disparities and socio-economic differences in RV vaccination rates.

DESIGN:

Children with acute gastroenteritis were enrolled. Stool was tested for presence of rotavirus using an enzyme immunoassay kit. Vaccination records were abstracted from the state immunization registry and healthcare providers to examine complete and incomplete vaccination status. Cases were identified as children receiving a complete RV dose series and controls were identified as children with incomplete RV doses. A logistic regression model was used to determine disparities seen amongst children with incomplete vaccination status.

RESULTS:

Racial differences between Black and white infants for RV vaccination rates were not significant when controlling for covariates (OR 1.15, 95% CI 0.74-1.78); however ethnicity (p-value .0230), age at onset of illness (p-value .0004), birth year (p-value < .0001), and DTaP vaccination status (p-value < .0001) were all significant in determining vaccination status for children.

CONCLUSIONS:

Racial disparities and socio-economic differences are not determinants in rotavirus vaccination rates; however, age and ethnicity have an effect on RV vaccine status.

KEYWORDS:

Rotavirus; disparities; gastroenteritis; health inequities; immunization; rotavirus vaccine

PMID:
27741577
PMCID:
PMC6314174
DOI:
10.1080/13557858.2016.1244744
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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