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Methods Mol Biol. 2017;1479:191-198.

Selective Osmotic Shock (SOS)-Based Islet Isolation for Microencapsulation.

Author information

1
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Wake Forest School for Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA.
2
Virginia Tech-Wake Forest School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences (SBES), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Blvd., Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA.
3
Department of Surgery, Section of Transplantation, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC, 27101, USA.
4
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA. eopara@wakehealth.edu.
5
Virginia Tech-Wake Forest School of Biomedical Engineering & Sciences (SBES), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA. eopara@wakehealth.edu.

Abstract

Islet transplantation (IT) has recently been shown to be a promising alternative to pancreas transplantation for reversing diabetes. IT requires the isolation of the islets from the pancreas, and these islets can be used to fabricate a bio-artificial pancreas. Enzymatic digestion is the current gold standard procedure for islet isolation but has lingering concerns. One such concern is that it has been shown to damage the islets due to nonselective tissue digestion. This chapter provides a detailed description of a nonenzymatic method that we are exploring in our lab as an alternative to current enzymatic digestion procedures for islet isolation from human and nonhuman pancreatic tissues. This method is based on selective destruction and protection of specific cell types and has been shown to leave the extracellular matrix (ECM) of islets intact, which may thus enhance islet viability and functionality. We also show that these SOS-isolated islets can be microencapsulated for transplantation.

KEYWORDS:

Alginate; Diabetes; Digestion; Islets; Microencapsulation; Nonenzymatic; Transplantation

PMID:
27738936
DOI:
10.1007/978-1-4939-6364-5_14
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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