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J Autism Dev Disord. 2017 Jan;47(1):90-100. doi: 10.1007/s10803-016-2933-z.

Evaluation of the ADHD Rating Scale in Youth with Autism.

Author information

1
Center for Autism Research, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 3535 Market Street, Ste 860, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. Yerysb@email.chop.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Yerysb@email.chop.edu.
3
Center for the Management of ADHD, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
4
Center for Autism Research, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 3535 Market Street, Ste 860, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA.
5
Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
6
Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
7
Department of Educational Psychology, Baylor University, Waco, TX, USA.
8
Department of Psychology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, USA.
9
Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
10
Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Abstract

Scientists and clinicians regularly use clinical screening tools for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to assess comorbidity without empirical evidence that these measures are valid in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We examined the prevalence of youth meeting ADHD criteria on the ADHD rating scale fourth edition (ADHD-RS-IV), the relationship of ADHD-RS-IV ratings with participant characteristics and behaviors, and its underlying factor structure in 386, 7-17 year olds with ASD without intellectual disability. Expected parent prevalence rates, relationships with age and externalizing behaviors were observed, but confirmatory factor analyses revealed unsatisfactory fits for one-, two-, three-factor models. Exploratory analyses revealed several items cross-loading on multiple factors. Implications of screening ADHD in youth with ASD using current diagnostic criteria are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder; Autism; Comorbidity; Factor analysis; Screening

PMID:
27738853
PMCID:
PMC5225038
[Available on 2018-01-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-016-2933-z
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