Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Science. 2016 Oct 14;354(6309):229-232.

Evolution of protein phosphorylation across 18 fungal species.

Author information

1
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD, UK.
2
Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.
3
Cell Signaling Research Group, Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, E-08003 Barcelona, Spain. EMBL, Genome Biology Unit, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany.
4
Cell Signaling Research Group, Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, E-08003 Barcelona, Spain.
5
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD, UK. EMBL, Genome Biology Unit, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany. pbeltrao@ebi.ac.uk jvillen@u.washington.edu.
6
Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. pbeltrao@ebi.ac.uk jvillen@u.washington.edu.

Abstract

Living organisms have evolved protein phosphorylation, a rapid and versatile mechanism that drives signaling and regulates protein function. We report the phosphoproteomes of 18 fungal species and a phylogenetic-based approach to study phosphosite evolution. We observe rapid divergence, with only a small fraction of phosphosites conserved over hundreds of millions of years. Relative to recently acquired phosphosites, ancient sites are enriched at protein interfaces and are more likely to be functionally important, as we show for sites on H2A1 and eIF4E. We also observe a change in phosphorylation motif frequencies and kinase activities that coincides with the whole-genome duplication event. Our results provide an evolutionary history for phosphosites and suggest that rapid evolution of phosphorylation can contribute strongly to phenotypic diversity.

PMID:
27738172
DOI:
10.1126/science.aaf2144
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center