Format

Send to

Choose Destination
N Biotechnol. 2017 Oct 25;39(Pt A):99-109. doi: 10.1016/j.nbt.2016.10.005. Epub 2016 Oct 11.

Insulin-like plant proteins as potential innovative drugs to treat diabetes-The Moringa oleifera case study.

Author information

1
Federal University of Ceara, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Campus do Pici, 60440-900, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.
2
Federal University of Ceara, Department of Biology, Campus do Pici, 60440-900, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.
3
Catholic University of Brasilia, Center of Proteomical and Biochemical Analyses, Brasilia, DF, Brazil; Catholic University Dom Bosco, S-Inova, Biotechnology, Campo Grande, MS, Brazil.
4
Federal University of Ceara, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Campus do Pici, 60440-900, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil. Electronic address: imvasco@ufc.br.

Abstract

Various plant species have long been used in traditional medicine worldwide to treat diabetes. Among the plant-based compounds with hypoglycemic properties, studies on insulin-like proteins isolated from leaves, fruits and seeds are rarely reported in the relevant literature. Our research group has been investigating the presence of insulin-like proteins in Moringa oleifera, a plant species native to India, and we have obtained a leaf protein isolate and semi-purified derived fractions, as well as a seed coat protein fraction (Mo-SC), with hypoglycemic activity in chemically induced diabetic mice that have increased tolerance to orally administered glucose. Equally importantly, Mo-SC possesses insulin-like antigenic epitopes. In this context, the present review aims to highlight that prospection of insulin-like proteins in plants is of the utmost importance both for finding new drugs for the treatment of diabetes and for shedding light on the mechanisms involved in diabetes.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes therapy; Hypoglycemic protein; Insulin-like plant protein; Moringa; Prospection

PMID:
27737801
DOI:
10.1016/j.nbt.2016.10.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center