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Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2016 Oct;20(10):1326-1333.

Population impact of factors associated with prevalent pulmonary tuberculosis in Tanzania.

Author information

1
National Institute for Medical Research, Muhimbili Medical Research Centre, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
2
International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, South-East Asia Regional Office, New Delhi, India.
3
Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research, Puducherry, India, India.
4
National Institute for Medical Research, Muhimbili Medical Research Centre, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
5
National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Programme, Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
6
Department of Global Health, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development, Amsterdam, KNCV Tuberculosis Foundation, The Hague, The Netherlands.
7
Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.

Erratum in

  • ERRATA. [Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2017]

Abstract

SETTING:

Tanzania has an estimated tuberculosis (TB) prevalence of 295 per 100 000 adult population. There is currently no nationally representative information on factors associated with TB in Tanzania.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the demographic and clinical factors associated with bacteriologically confirmed TB in the adult general population of Tanzania.

DESIGN:

A case-control study nested in a nationally representative TB prevalence survey. All patients with bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary TB (PTB) constituted cases and a representative sample of people without bacteriologically confirmed PTB constituted controls. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (aORs) to identify factors associated with TB.

RESULTS:

Age groups 25-34 years (aOR 3.7, 95%CI 1.5-8.8) and 55-64 years (aOR 2.5, 95%CI 1.1-5.5), male sex (aOR 1.6, 95%CI 1.1-2.3) and low body mass index (BMI) (aOR 1.7, 95%CI 1.1-2.8) were significantly associated with TB. Association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and diabetes mellitus (DM) was not statistically significant. The population attributable fraction (PAF) was 2% (95%CI -2 to 5) for DM and 3% (95%CI -2 to 8) for HIV.

CONCLUSION:

Being in an older age group, being male and having a low BMI were associated with bacteriologically confirmed PTB. On the population level, classic risk factors for TB have no major effect on prevalent TB from which future transmission may occur.

PMID:
27725043
DOI:
10.5588/ijtld.15.0608
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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