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Brain Imaging Behav. 2017 Oct;11(5):1316-1325. doi: 10.1007/s11682-016-9622-6.

Post-traumatic stress influences local and remote functional connectivity: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, No.305 Zhongshan East Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, 210002, China.
2
Department of Radiology, People's Hospital of Hainan Province, Haikou, 570311, China.
3
Mental Health Institute, the Second Xiangya Hospital, National Technology Institute of Psychiatry, Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, Central South University, No.139 Middle Renmin Road, Changsha, Hunan Province, 410011, China.
4
Mental Health Institute, the Second Xiangya Hospital, National Technology Institute of Psychiatry, Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, Central South University, No.139 Middle Renmin Road, Changsha, Hunan Province, 410011, China. zhangli-mail@163.com.
5
Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, No.305 Zhongshan East Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, 210002, China. cjr.luguangming@vip.163.com.

Abstract

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with alterations in regional brain activation and remote functional connectivity (FC) in limbic and prefrontal cortex. However, little is known about local FC changes following a traumatic event. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance images were collected for typhoon survivors with (n = 27) and without PTSD (n = 33), and healthy controls (n = 30). Local FC was examined by calculating regional homogeneity (ReHo), and remote FC was investigated between regions showing significant ReHo group differences. The PTSD group showed ReHo changes in multiple regions, including the amygdala, parahippocampal gyrus, and prefrontal cortex relative to both control groups. Compared with healthy controls, typhoon survivors had increased ReHo in the insula/inferior frontal gyrus, middle and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (MCC/dACC), as well as enhanced negative FC between the MCC/dACC and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC)/precuneus. The typhoon-exposed control group exhibited higher ReHo in the PCC/precuneus than the PTSD and healthy control groups. Furthermore, positive correlations were found between PTSD symptom severity and ReHo in several regions. Post-traumatic stress can influence local and remote FC, irrespective of PTSD diagnosis. Future studies are needed to validate the findings and to determine whether the alterations represent pre-existing or acquired deficits.

KEYWORDS:

Functional connectivity; Functional magnetic resonance imaging; Post-traumatic stress disorder; Regional homogeneity; Trauma

PMID:
27722829
DOI:
10.1007/s11682-016-9622-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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