Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychiatry Res. 2016 Dec 30;246:218-222. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.06.060. Epub 2016 Oct 5.

Physical activity as a vital sign in patients with bipolar disorder.

Author information

1
KU Leuven - University of Leuven Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Leuven, Belgium; KU Leuven - University of Leuven, University Psychiatric Center KU Leuven, Kortenberg-Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: davy.vancampfort@uc-kortenberg.be.
2
KU Leuven - University of Leuven Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Leuven, Belgium.
3
KU Leuven - University of Leuven, University Psychiatric Center KU Leuven, Kortenberg-Leuven, Belgium.
4
Physiotherapy Department, South London and Maudsley NHS FoundationTrust, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AZ, United Kingdom; Health Service and Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience King's College London, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, United Kingdom.
5
School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

The most significant contributor to premature mortality in patients with bipolar disorder is preventable cardiovascular diseases. This study investigated if the Physical Activity Vital Sign (PAVS) assessment (two questions which clarify if a person meets the recommended 150min of physical activity per week) can identify patients with bipolar disorder at higher risk of cardio-metabolic abnormalities. Clinical differences between those who adhere and those who did not adhere to the physical activity guidelines were investigated using an ANCOVA controlling for age and gender. Sixty-five (29♂) in- and outpatients with bipolar disorder (age=45.1±9.8years) completed the PAVS-questions, underwent full-fasting metabolic screening, and performed a six-minute walk test (6MWT). Those patients not meeting the physical activity recommendations had a higher body mass index, performed worse on the 6MWT and were at a significantly higher risk for cardio-metabolic diseases. Relative risks ranged from 1.33 for having dyslipidemia to 5.33 for hyperglycemia. The current data offer the first evidence that the PAVS assessment might be a useful vital sign in the routine assessment of in- and outpatients with bipolar disorder.

KEYWORDS:

Bipolar disorder; Exercise; Hypertension; Metabolic syndrome; Obesity; Physical activity

PMID:
27721060
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2016.06.060
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center