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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2016 Dec;75(6):1210-1215. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2016.07.046. Epub 2016 Oct 6.

Incidence and survival of sebaceous carcinoma in the United States.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio; Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. Electronic address: rxt177@case.edu.
2
Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.
3
Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.
4
Department of Dermatology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio; Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Information on risk factors, epidemiology, and clinical characteristics of sebaceous carcinoma (SC) is limited.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to analyze trends in SC in the United States from 2000 through 2012.

METHODS:

We used data from the 18 registries of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program from 2000 to 2012 to calculate the cause of death, relative frequencies/incidences, 5-/10-year Kaplan-Meier survival, hazard ratios, and incidence rates for SC. Each parameter was analyzed by age, location of occurrence (ocular/extraocular), race, sex, and SEER registry.

RESULTS:

Overall incidence was 0.32 (male) and 0.16 (female) per 100,000 person-years. Incidence significantly increased, primarily because of an increase among men. Incidence among whites was almost 3 times the rate among non-whites. Male sex (P < .0001), black race (P = .01), and extraocular anatomic location (P < .0001) were associated with significantly higher all-cause mortality. However, overall case-specific mortality for SC decreased significantly.

LIMITATIONS:

Underregistration of patients in SEER registries, lack of verification of individual diagnoses, and low levels of staging data because of low stage-classification rate are limitations.

CONCLUSIONS:

The overall incidence of SC is increasing significantly. Male sex, black race, and extraocular occurrences are associated with significantly greater mortality.

KEYWORDS:

Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results; cutaneous; epidemiology; extraocular; incidence; mortality; ocular; sebaceous carcinoma; skin cancer; survival

PMID:
27720512
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2016.07.046
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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