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BMC Biol. 2016 Oct 3;14(1):84.

Emergence of wheat blast in Bangladesh was caused by a South American lineage of Magnaporthe oryzae.

Author information

1
Department of Biotechnology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University, Gazipur, 1706, Bangladesh. tofazzalislam@yahoo.com.
2
Plant Pathology, Institute of Integrative Biology, ETH Zurich, 8092, Zurich, Switzerland.
3
INRA, UMR 385 Biologie et génétique des interactions plantes-pathogènes BGPI, Montpellier, France.
4
College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QD, UK.
5
Earlham Institute, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7UH, UK.
6
Department of Biotechnology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University, Gazipur, 1706, Bangladesh.
7
Argo-Environmental Remote Sensing and Modeling Lab, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute, Joydebpur 1701, Gazipur, Bangladesh.
8
Directorate of Grains Industry, Department of Agriculture and Food Western Australia (DAFWA), 3 Baron-Hay Court, South Perth, WA, 6151, Australia.
9
Brazilian Agricultural Research Enterprise - EMBRAPA Wheat/Trigo, Passo Fundo, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
10
Department of Crop Protection, Rural Engineering, and Soil Science, University of São Paulo State - UNESP, IlhaSolteira Campus, São Paulo, Brazil.
11
CIRAD, UMR 385 Biologie et génétique des interactions plantes-pathogènes BGPI, Montpellier, France.
12
The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7UH, UK.
13
Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Carl-von-Linné-Weg 10, Cologne, 50829, Germany.
14
INRA, UMR 1290 Biologie et Gestion des Risques en agriculture BIOGER, Thiverval-Grignon, France.
15
John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7UH, UK.
16
The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7UH, UK. sophien.kamoun@tsl.ac.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In February 2016, a new fungal disease was spotted in wheat fields across eight districts in Bangladesh. The epidemic spread to an estimated 15,000 hectares, about 16 % of the cultivated wheat area in Bangladesh, with yield losses reaching up to 100 %. Within weeks of the onset of the epidemic, we performed transcriptome sequencing of symptomatic leaf samples collected directly from Bangladeshi fields.

RESULTS:

Reinoculation of seedlings with strains isolated from infected wheat grains showed wheat blast symptoms on leaves of wheat but not rice. Our phylogenomic and population genomic analyses revealed that the wheat blast outbreak in Bangladesh was most likely caused by a wheat-infecting South American lineage of the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings suggest that genomic surveillance can be rapidly applied to monitor plant disease outbreaks and provide valuable information regarding the identity and origin of the infectious agent.

KEYWORDS:

Eleusine indica; Field pathogenomics; Oryza sativa; Phylogenomic analysis; Wheat blast

PMID:
27716181
PMCID:
PMC5047043
DOI:
10.1186/s12915-016-0309-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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