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Sci Rep. 2016 Oct 7;6:34589. doi: 10.1038/srep34589.

Differential transcriptional responses to Ebola and Marburg virus infection in bat and human cells.

Author information

1
RNA Bioinformatics and High Throughput Analysis, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Leutragraben 1, 07743, Jena, Germany.
2
Institute of Virology, Philipps University Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Str. 2, 35043 Marburg, Germany.
3
German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), partner site Gießen-Marburg-Langen, Hans-Meerwein Str. 2, 35043, Marburg, Germany.
4
Bioinformatics Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Leipzig, Härtelstraße 16-18, 04107, Leipzig, Germany.
5
FLI Leibniz Institute for Age Research, Beutenbergstraße 11, 07745 Jena, Germany.
6
Transcriptome Bioinformatics, Junior Research Group, Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases, University of Leipzig, Härtelstraße 16-18, 04107, Leipzig, Germany.
7
Center for non-coding RNA in Technology and Health, University of Copenhagen, Grønnegårdsvej 3, 1870, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
8
Department of Veterinary Clinical and Animal Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Grønnegårdsvej 3, 1870, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
9
Theoretical Biochemistry Group, Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währingerstraße 17, 1090, Vienna, Austria.
10
Bioinformatics Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 106, 79110, Freiburg, Germany.
11
Research Group Theoretical Systems Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Ernst-Abbe-Platz 2, 07743, Jena, Germany.
12
Institute of Computer Science, Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Von-Seckendorff-Platz 1, 06120, Halle/Saale, Germany.
13
Department of Soil Ecology, UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, 06120, Halle/Saale, Germany.
14
German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5e, 04103, Leipzig, Germany.
15
Biozentrum, University of Basel, Klingelbergstraße 50/70, CH-4056, Basel, Switzerland.
16
Chair of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Ernst-Abbe-Platz 2, 07743, Jena, Germany.
17
Junior Professorship for Computational EvoDevo, Bioinformatics, Department of Computer Science, University of Leipzig, Härtelstraße 16-18, 04107, Leipzig, Germany.
18
TFome Research Group, Bioinformatics Group, Interdisciplinary Center of Bioinformatics, Department of Computer Science, University of Leipzig, Härtelstraße 16-18, 04107, Leipzig, Germany.
19
Paul-Flechsig-Institute for Brain Research, University of Leipzig, Jahnallee 54, 04109, Leipzig, Germany.
20
Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology Hans Knöll Institute (HKI), Systems Biology and Bioinformatics, Beutenbergstraße 11a, 07745, Jena, Germany.
21
Department of Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, UFZ-Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
22
Doctoral School of Science and Technology, AZM Center for Biotechnology Research, Lebanese University, Tripoli, Lebanon.
23
TRON - Translational Oncology at the University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz gGmbH, Mainz, Germany.
24
Institute of Aquaculture, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland, U.K.
25
Medical University of Vienna, Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Währingerstraße 13, 1090, Vienna, Austria.
26
Centre for Biological Signalling Studies (BIOSS), University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
27
Research group Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Faculty of Computer Science, University of Vienna, Währingerstraße 29, 1090, Vienna, Austria.
28
Research Group Medical Systems Biology, Institute for Experimental Medicine, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105, Kiel, Germany.

Abstract

The unprecedented outbreak of Ebola in West Africa resulted in over 28,000 cases and 11,000 deaths, underlining the need for a better understanding of the biology of this highly pathogenic virus to develop specific counter strategies. Two filoviruses, the Ebola and Marburg viruses, result in a severe and often fatal infection in humans. However, bats are natural hosts and survive filovirus infections without obvious symptoms. The molecular basis of this striking difference in the response to filovirus infections is not well understood. We report a systematic overview of differentially expressed genes, activity motifs and pathways in human and bat cells infected with the Ebola and Marburg viruses, and we demonstrate that the replication of filoviruses is more rapid in human cells than in bat cells. We also found that the most strongly regulated genes upon filovirus infection are chemokine ligands and transcription factors. We observed a strong induction of the JAK/STAT pathway, of several genes encoding inhibitors of MAP kinases (DUSP genes) and of PPP1R15A, which is involved in ER stress-induced cell death. We used comparative transcriptomics to provide a data resource that can be used to identify cellular responses that might allow bats to survive filovirus infections.

PMID:
27713552
PMCID:
PMC5054393
DOI:
10.1038/srep34589
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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