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Pharmaceuticals (Basel). 2010 Sep 6;3(9):2970-2985.

Tissue Engineering of Cartilage; Can Cannabinoids Help?

Author information

  • 1Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience and Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland. gowrana@tcd.ie.
  • 2Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience and Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland.
  • 3Trinity Centre for Bio-Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland.

Abstract

This review discusses the role of the cannabinoid system in cartilage tissue and endeavors to establish if targeting the cannabinoid system has potential in mesenchymal stem cell based tissue-engineered cartilage repair strategies. The review discusses the potential of cannabinoids to protect against the degradation of cartilage in inflamed arthritic joints and the influence of cannabinoids on the chondrocyte precursors, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We provide experimental evidence to show that activation of the cannabinoid system enhances the survival, migration and chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, which are three major tenets behind the success of a cell-based tissue-engineered cartilage repair strategy. These findings highlight the potential for cannabinoids to provide a dual function by acting as anti-inflammatory agents as well as regulators of MSC biology in order to enhance tissue engineering strategies aimed at cartilage repair.

KEYWORDS:

cannabinoid receptors; cartilage; mesenchymal stem cells; osteoarthritis; phytocannabinoids

PMID:
27713386
PMCID:
PMC4034107
DOI:
10.3390/ph3092970
[PubMed - in process]
Free PMC Article

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