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Ageing Res Rev. 2017 May;35:222-240. doi: 10.1016/j.arr.2016.09.010. Epub 2016 Oct 3.

Nutrition for the ageing brain: Towards evidence for an optimal diet.

Author information

1
University of East Anglia, Norwich Medical School, Norwich NR4 7UQ, United Kingdom.
2
Abbott Nutrition R&D, Abbott Laboratories, Camino de Purchil 68, 18004 Granada, Spain.
3
Wrigley (Mars Inc.), 1132 W. Blackhawk Street, 60612 Chicago, IL, United States.
4
University of Barcelona, Av Joan XXIII s/n, 08028 Barcelona, Spain.
5
International Life Sciences Institute, Europe (ILSI Europe), Av E. Mounier 83, Box 6, 1200 Brussels, Belgium.
6
Univ. Bordeaux, Inserm, U897, F33076 Bordeaux Cedex, France.
7
Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences, EPFL Innovation Park, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
8
The Microsoft Research-University of Trento, Centre for Computational and Systems Biology (COSBI), Piazza Manifattura 1, 38068 Rovereto, TN, Italy.
9
Oxford University, Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus, Roosevelt Drive, OX3 7LF Oxford, United Kingdom.
10
Loughborough University, Brockington Building, Asby Road, LE11 3TU Loughborough, United Kingdom.
11
Radboud University Medical Center, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
12
IRCCS-Instituto di Richerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via G. La Masa 19, 20156 Milan, Italy.
13
INRA, UMR 1019, Human Nutrition Unit, CRNH Auvergne, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France.
14
Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, SW7 2AZ London, United Kingdom.
15
University of Southampton, Tremona Road, SO16 6YD Southampton, United Kingdom.
16
Joseph Fourier University, Domaine de la Merci, 38706 La Tronche, France.
17
International Life Sciences Institute, Europe (ILSI Europe), Av E. Mounier 83, Box 6, 1200 Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: publications@ilsieurope.be.
18
Nutricia Research, Nutricia Advances Medical Nutrition, P.O. Box 80141, 3508TC Utrecht, The Netherlands.
19
University of Reading, Whiteknights, P.O. Box 217, RG6 6AH Reading, Berkshire, United Kingdom.
20
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, The Maurice Wohl Clinical Neuroscience Institute, 125 Coldharbour Lane, SE5 9NU London, United Kingdom.
21
Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen, The Netherlands.
22
University of Antwerp, Leopoldstraat 26, 2000 Antwerpen, Belgium.
23
Wesnes Cognition Ltd., Little Paddock, Streatley on Thames RG8 9RD, United Kingdom; Department of Psychology, Northumbria University, Newcastle, United Kingdom; Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia; Medicinal Plant Research Group, Newcastle University, United Kingdom.
24
University of Bath, Claverton Down, BA2 7AY Bath, United Kingdom.
25
Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, TW20 0EX Surrey, United Kingdom.

Abstract

As people age they become increasingly susceptible to chronic and extremely debilitating brain diseases. The precise cause of the neuronal degeneration underlying these disorders, and indeed normal brain ageing remains however elusive. Considering the limits of existing preventive methods, there is a desire to develop effective and safe strategies. Growing preclinical and clinical research in healthy individuals or at the early stage of cognitive decline has demonstrated the beneficial impact of nutrition on cognitive functions. The present review is the most recent in a series produced by the Nutrition and Mental Performance Task Force under the auspice of the International Life Sciences Institute Europe (ILSI Europe). The latest scientific advances specific to how dietary nutrients and non-nutrient may affect cognitive ageing are presented. Furthermore, several key points related to mechanisms contributing to brain ageing, pathological conditions affecting brain function, and brain biomarkers are also discussed. Overall, findings are inconsistent and fragmented and more research is warranted to determine the underlying mechanisms and to establish dose-response relationships for optimal brain maintenance in different population subgroups. Such approaches are likely to provide the necessary evidence to develop research portfolios that will inform about new dietary recommendations on how to prevent cognitive decline.

KEYWORDS:

Cognition; Cognitive ageing; Cognitive decline; Neuroinflammation; Neuroprotection; Preventive diet

PMID:
27713095
DOI:
10.1016/j.arr.2016.09.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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