Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Biochem Sci. 2017 Feb;42(2):98-110. doi: 10.1016/j.tibs.2016.08.008. Epub 2016 Oct 3.

Alternative Splicing May Not Be the Key to Proteome Complexity.

Author information

1
Structural Biology and Bioinformatics Programme, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Melchor Fernández Almagro, 3, 28029 Madrid, Spain.
2
Structural Biology and Bioinformatics Programme, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Melchor Fernández Almagro, 3, 28029 Madrid, Spain; Human Genetics Department, Sandhu Group, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK.
3
Structural Biology and Bioinformatics Programme, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Melchor Fernández Almagro, 3, 28029 Madrid, Spain; National Bioinformatics Institute (INB), Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Melchor Fernández Almagro, 3, 28029 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: valencia@cnio.es.

Abstract

Alternative splicing is commonly believed to be a major source of cellular protein diversity. However, although many thousands of alternatively spliced transcripts are routinely detected in RNA-seq studies, reliable large-scale mass spectrometry-based proteomics analyses identify only a small fraction of annotated alternative isoforms. The clearest finding from proteomics experiments is that most human genes have a single main protein isoform, while those alternative isoforms that are identified tend to be the most biologically plausible: those with the most cross-species conservation and those that do not compromise functional domains. Indeed, most alternative exons do not seem to be under selective pressure, suggesting that a large majority of predicted alternative transcripts may not even be translated into proteins.

KEYWORDS:

RNA-seq; alternative splicing; dominant isoforms; functional isoforms; homology; proteomics

PMID:
27712956
DOI:
10.1016/j.tibs.2016.08.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center