Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Mayo Clin Proc. 2016 Oct;91(10):1336-1345. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2016.07.004.

Physician Attitudes About Maintenance of Certification: A Cross-Specialty National Survey.

Author information

1
Mayo Clinic Online Learning, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN; Division of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Electronic address: cook.david33@mayo.edu.
2
University of South Carolina, Columbia.
3
Division of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
4
Division of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine physicians' perceptions of current maintenance of certification (MOC) activities and to explore how perceptions vary across specialties, practice characteristics, and physician characteristics, including burnout.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

We conducted an Internet and paper survey among a national cross-specialty random sample of licensed US physicians from September 23, 2015, through April 18, 2016. The questionnaire included 13 MOC items, 2 burnout items, and demographic variables.

RESULTS:

Of 4583 potential respondents, we received 988 responses (response rate 21.6%) closely reflecting the distribution of US physician specialties. Twenty-four percent of physicians (200 of 842) agreed that MOC activities are relevant to their patients, and 15% (122 of 824) felt they are worth the time and effort. Although 27% (223 of 834) perceived adequate support for MOC activities, only 12% (101 of 832) perceived that they are well-integrated in their daily routine and 81% (673 of 835) believed they are a burden. Nine percent (76 of 834) believed that patients care about their MOC status. Forty percent or fewer agreed that various MOC activities contribute to their professional development. Attitudes varied statistically significantly (P<.001) across specialties, but reflected low perceived relevance and value in nearly all specialties. Thirty-eight percent of respondents met criteria for being burned out. We found no association of attitudes toward MOC with burnout, certification status, practice size, rural or urban practice location, compensation model, or time since completion of training.

CONCLUSION:

Dissatisfaction with current MOC programs is pervasive and not localized to specific sectors or specialties. Unresolved negative perceptions will impede optimal physician engagement in MOC.

PMID:
27712632
DOI:
10.1016/j.mayocp.2016.07.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center