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Dalton Trans. 2016 Sep 13;45(36):14101-14108.

Near infrared light-mediated photoactivation of cytotoxic Re(i) complexes by using lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles.

Author information

1
Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637371 Singapore.
2
MOE Key Laboratory of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, P. R. China. cesmzw@mail.sysu.edu.cn caoqian3@mail.sysu.edu.cn.
3
Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637371 Singapore and Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE); Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR); Singapore, 117602 Singapore. bengang@ntu.edu.sg.

Abstract

Platinum-based chemotherapy, although it has been well proven to be effective in the battle against cancer, suffers from limited specificity, severe side effects and drug resistance. The development of new alternatives with potent anticancer effects and improved specificity is therefore urgently needed. Recently, there are some new chemotherapy reagents based on photoactive Re(i) complexes which have been reported as promising alternatives to improve specificity mainly attributed to the spatial and temporal activation process by light irradiation. However, most of them respond to short-wavelength light (e.g. UV, blue or green light), which may cause unwanted photo damage to cells. Herein, we demonstrate a system for near-infrared (NIR) light controlled activation of Re(i) complex cytotoxicity by integration of photoactivatable Re(i) complexes and lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs). Upon NIR irradiation at 980 nm, the Re(i) complex can be locally activated by upconverted UV light emitted from UCNPs and subsequently leads to enhanced cell lethality. Cytotoxicity studies showed effective inactivation of both drug susceptible human ovarian carcinoma A2780 cells and cisplatin resistant subline A2780cis cells by our UCNP based system with NIR irradiation, and there was minimum light toxicity observed in the whole process, suggesting that such a system could provide a promising strategy to control localized activation of Re(i) complexes and therefore minimize potential side effects.

PMID:
27711690
DOI:
10.1039/c6dt01569g
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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