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PLoS One. 2016 Oct 6;11(10):e0164134. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0164134. eCollection 2016.

Hemizygous Deletion on Chromosome 3p26.1 Is Associated with Heavy Smoking among African American Subjects in the COPDGene Study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
2
Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
3
Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, Colorado, United States of America.
4
Department of Biostatisitics and Informatics, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, Colorado, United States of America.
5
Channing Division of Network Medicine and Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
6
Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
7
Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado, United States of America.

Abstract

Many well-powered genome-wide association studies have identified genetic determinants of self-reported smoking behaviors and measures of nicotine dependence, but most have not considered the role of structural variants, such as copy number variation (CNVs), influencing these phenotypes. Here, we included 2,889 African American and 6,187 non-Hispanic White subjects from the COPDGene cohort (http://www.copdgene.org) to carefully investigate the role of polymorphic CNVs across the genome on various measures of smoking behavior. We identified a CNV component (a hemizygous deletion) on chromosome 3p26.1 associated with two quantitative phenotypes related to smoking behavior among African Americans. This polymorphic hemizygous deletion is significantly associated with pack-years and cigarettes smoked per day among African American subjects in the COPDGene study. We sought evidence of replication in African Americans from the population based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. While we observed similar CNV counts, the extent of exposure to cigarette smoking among ARIC subjects was quite different and the smaller sample size of heavy smokers in ARIC severely limited statistical power, so we were unable to replicate our findings from the COPDGene cohort. But meta-analyses of COPDGene and ARIC study subjects strengthened our association signal. However, a few linkage studies have reported suggestive linkage to the 3p26.1 region, and a few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have reported markers in the gene (GRM7) nearest to this 3p26.1 area of polymorphic deletions are associated with measures of nicotine dependence among subjects of European ancestry.

PMID:
27711239
PMCID:
PMC5053531
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0164134
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

Competing Interests: This study was supported by Award Number R01 HL089856, R01 HL089897 (EKS and JDC), K01HL125858 (SML), and R01 HL113264 (MHC) from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The COPDGene® project is also supported by the COPD Foundation through contributions made to an Industry Advisory Board comprised of AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Novartis, Pfizer, Siemens, Sunovion, and GlaxoSmithKline. In the past three years, Edwin K. Silverman received honoraria and consulting fees from Merck, grant support and consulting fees from GlaxoSmithKline, and 331 honoraria and travel support from Novartis. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study is carried out as a collaborative study supported by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute contracts (HHSN268201100005C, HHSN268201100006C, HHSN268201100007C, HHSN268201100008C, HHSN268201100009C, HHSN268201100010C, HHSN268201100011C, and HHSN268201100012C), R01HL087641, R01HL59367 and R01HL086694; National Human Genome Research Institute contract U01HG004402; and National Institutes of Health contract HHSN268200625226C. Infrastructure was partly supported by Grant Number UL1RR025005, a component of the National Institutes of Health and NIH Roadmap for Medical Research. This support has not altered our adherence to PLOS ONE policies on sharing data and materials.

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