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Mov Disord. 2017 Jan;32(1):108-114. doi: 10.1002/mds.26813. Epub 2016 Oct 6.

Increased basal ganglia binding of 18 F-AV-1451 in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy.

Author information

1
Skåne University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Lund, Sweden.
2
Lund University, Clinical Memory Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Malmö, Sweden.
3
Skåne University Hospital, Department of Radiation Physics, Lund, Sweden.
4
Skåne University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Lund, Sweden.
5
Skåne University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Lund, Sweden.
6
Roche Pharmaceutical Research and Early Development, Neuroscience Discovery & Biomarkers, Roche Innovation Center, Basel, Switzerland.
7
MedTech West and the University of Gothenburg, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Gothenburg, Sweden.
8
Skåne University Hospital, Memory Clinic, Malmö, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is difficult to diagnose accurately. The recently developed tau PET tracers may improve the diagnostic work-up of PSP.

METHODS:

Regional tau accumulation was studied using 18 F-AV-1451 PET in 11 patients with PSP and 11 age-matched healthy controls in the Swedish BioFinder study.

RESULTS:

18 F-AV-1451 standard uptake volume ratios were significantly higher in the basal ganglia in PSP patients when compared with controls (globus pallidus 1.75 vs 1.50; putamen 1.51 vs 1.35). Retention in the basal ganglia was correlated with age in both groups (r = .43-.78, P < .05). In PSP, we observed a significant correlation between clinical deterioration measured with the PSP rating scale and standard uptake volume ratios in the globus pallidus (r = .74, P < .05). However, no 18 F-AV-1451 retention was observed in the cerebral cortex or white matter of either PSP patients or controls, and autoradiography did not reveal any specific binding of AV-1451 to PSP tau aggregates.

CONCLUSION:

We found higher 18 F-AV-1451 retention in the basal ganglia of PSP patients when compared with healthy elderly controls, but also increases with age in both controls and patients. As a result of the overlap in retention between diagnostic groups and the age-dependent increase present also in controls, 18 F-AV-1451 PET might not reliably distinguish individual patients with PSP from controls. However, further studies are needed to evaluate whether 18 F-AV-1451 PET might be useful as a progression marker in clinical PSP trials. © The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

KEYWORDS:

Progressive supranuclear palsy; basal ganglia; positron emission tomography; tau

PMID:
27709757
DOI:
10.1002/mds.26813
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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