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Science. 2016 Sep 30;353(6307). pii: aah3374.

Pathological α-synuclein transmission initiated by binding lymphocyte-activation gene 3.

Author information

1
Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA.
2
Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
3
Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Division of Pharmacology, Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Suwon 440-746, South Korea.
4
Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Department of Physiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 443-721, South Korea.
5
Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Department of Neurology, Xin Hua Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092, China.
6
Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBio Technology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.
7
Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA.
8
Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA. Tumor Microenvironment Center, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15232, USA.
9
Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA. Department of Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. tdawson@jhmi.edu hko3@jhmi.edu vdawson1@jhmi.edu.
10
Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA. tdawson@jhmi.edu hko3@jhmi.edu vdawson1@jhmi.edu.
11
Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBio Technology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA. Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. tdawson@jhmi.edu hko3@jhmi.edu vdawson1@jhmi.edu.

Abstract

Emerging evidence indicates that the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) may be due to cell-to-cell transmission of misfolded preformed fibrils (PFF) of α-synuclein (α-syn). The mechanism by which α-syn PFF spreads from neuron to neuron is not known. Here, we show that LAG3 (lymphocyte-activation gene 3) binds α-syn PFF with high affinity (dissociation constant = 77 nanomolar), whereas the α-syn monomer exhibited minimal binding. α-Syn-biotin PFF binding to LAG3 initiated α-syn PFF endocytosis, transmission, and toxicity. Lack of LAG3 substantially delayed α-syn PFF-induced loss of dopamine neurons, as well as biochemical and behavioral deficits in vivo. The identification of LAG3 as a receptor that binds α-syn PFF provides a target for developing therapeutics designed to slow the progression of PD and related α-synucleinopathies.

PMID:
27708076
PMCID:
PMC5510615
DOI:
10.1126/science.aah3374
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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