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Healthcare (Basel). 2016 Sep 30;4(4). pii: E74.

The Role of Family in a Dietary Risk Reduction Intervention for Cardiovascular Disease.

Author information

1
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, NSW, Australia. tracy.schumacher@uon.edu.au.
2
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, NSW, Australia. tracy.schumacher@uon.edu.au.
3
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, NSW, Australia. tracy.burrows@newcastle.edu.au.
4
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, NSW, Australia. tracy.burrows@newcastle.edu.au.
5
USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Centre, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. dit@bcm.edu.
6
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, NSW, Australia. robin.callister@newcastle.edu.au.
7
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, NSW, Australia. robin.callister@newcastle.edu.au.
8
Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health & Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, NSW, Australia. neil.spratt@newcastle.edu.au.
9
Hunter New England Local Health District & Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton Heights 2305, NSW, Australia. neil.spratt@newcastle.edu.au.
10
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, NSW, Australia. clare.collins@newcastle.edu.au.
11
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, NSW, Australia. clare.collins@newcastle.edu.au.

Abstract

Diet is an essential strategy for the prevention of primary and secondary cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. The objectives were to examine: how families at increased risk of CVD perceived personal risk, their motivations to make dietary changes, their understanding of diet, and the influence of other family members. Individuals (>18 years) who completed an Australian family-based CVD risk reduction program were invited to a semi-structured telephone interview. Responses were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a systematic deductive approach with coding derived from key concepts developed as part of the interview structure. Seventeen participants from eight families were interviewed (aged 18-70 years, 47% male, five with CVD diagnosis). Key themes indicated both intrinsic and extrinsic motivations to improve heart health, variations in risk perception, recognition of the role diet plays in heart health, and the extent of family influences on eating patterns. Discrepancies between perceived and actual CVD risk perception impacted on perceived "need" to modify current dietary patterns towards heart health recommendations. Therefore, strategies not reliant on risk perception are needed to engage those with low risk perception. This could involve identifying and accessing the family "ringleader" to influence involvement and capitalising on personal accountability to other family members.

KEYWORDS:

cardiovascular; family; health behaviour; nutrition; protection motivation theory

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