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Sci Rep. 2016 Oct 5;6:34363. doi: 10.1038/srep34363.

Antibody titres and boosting after natural malaria infection in BK-SE36 vaccine responders during a follow-up study in Uganda.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Protozoology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 Japan.
2
Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka 545-8585, Japan.
3
Sumida Hospital, Medical Co. Living Together Association (LTA) Clinical Pharmacology Center, Tokyo 130-0021 Japan.
4
Med Biotech Laboratories, Plot 4-6 Bell Close, Port Bell Road Luzira, Kampala, Uganda.
5
Department of Disease Control and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.
6
The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, 2-9-41 Yahata-cho, Kanonji, Kagawa 768-0061 Japan.

Abstract

The malaria vaccine BK-SE36 is a recombinant protein (SE36) based on the Honduras 1 serine repeat antigen-5 of Plasmodium falciparum, adsorbed to aluminium hydroxide gel. The phase Ib trial in Uganda demonstrated the safety and immunogenicity of BK-SE36. Ancillary analysis in the follow-up study of 6-20 year-old volunteers suggest significant differences in time to first episodes of clinical malaria in vaccinees compared to placebo/control group. Here, we aimed to get further insights into the association of anti-SE36 antibody titres and natural P. falciparum infection. Children who received BK-SE36 and whose antibody titres against SE36 increased by ≥1.92-fold after vaccination were categorised as responders. Most responders did not have or only had a single episode of natural P. falciparum infection. Notably, responders who did not experience infection had relatively high anti-SE36 antibody titres post-second vaccination compared to those who were infected. The anti-SE36 antibody titres of the responders who experienced malaria were boosted after infection and they had lower risk of reinfection. These findings show that anti-SE36 antibody titres induced by BK-SE36 vaccination offered protection against malaria. The vaccine is now being evaluated in a phase Ib trial in children less than 5 years old.

PMID:
27703240
PMCID:
PMC5050508
DOI:
10.1038/srep34363
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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