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J Psychopharmacol. 2017 Jan;31(1):3-16. doi: 10.1177/0269881116668592. Epub 2016 Oct 4.

The ICCAM platform study: An experimental medicine platform for evaluating new drugs for relapse prevention in addiction. Part B: fMRI description.

Author information

1
1 Centre for Neuropsychopharmacology, Division of Brain Sciences, Imperial College London, London, UK.
2
2 Neuroscience and Psychiatry Unit, Institute of Brain, Behaviour and Mental Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
3
3 Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
4
4 Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
5
5 Imanova Limited, London, UK.
6
6 Centre for Neuroinflammation and Neurodegeneration, Division of Brain Sciences, Imperial College London, London, UK.
7
7 Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
8
8 Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust, Fulbourn, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We aimed to set up a robust multi-centre clinical fMRI and neuropsychological platform to investigate the neuropharmacology of brain processes relevant to addiction - reward, impulsivity and emotional reactivity. Here we provide an overview of the fMRI battery, carried out across three centres, characterizing neuronal response to the tasks, along with exploring inter-centre differences in healthy participants.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:

Three fMRI tasks were used: monetary incentive delay to probe reward sensitivity, go/no-go to probe impulsivity and an evocative images task to probe emotional reactivity. A coordinate-based activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis was carried out for the reward and impulsivity tasks to help establish region of interest (ROI) placement. A group of healthy participants was recruited from across three centres (total n=43) to investigate inter-centre differences. Principle observations: The pattern of response observed for each of the three tasks was consistent with previous studies using similar paradigms. At the whole brain level, significant differences were not observed between centres for any task.

CONCLUSIONS:

In developing this platform we successfully integrated neuroimaging data from three centres, adapted validated tasks and applied whole brain and ROI approaches to explore and demonstrate their consistency across centres.

KEYWORDS:

Brain; human; magnetic resonance imaging; substance-related disorders

PMID:
27703042
PMCID:
PMC5367542
DOI:
10.1177/0269881116668592
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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