Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2016 Oct 4;11(10):e0164220. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0164220. eCollection 2016.

Low-Grade Inflammation Is Associated with Susceptibility to Infection in Healthy Men: Results from the Danish Blood Donor Study (DBDS).

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Immunology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
2
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
3
Department of Clinical Immunology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen S, Denmark.
4
Department of Clinical Immunology, Naestved Hospital, Naestved, Denmark.
5
Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen S, Denmark.
6
Department of Clinical Immunology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The aim of this study was to examine whether low-grade inflammation (LGI) is associated with a subsequently increased risk of infection.

METHODS:

We included 15,754 healthy participants from the Danish Blood Donor Study, who completed a questionnaire on health-related items. LGI was defined as a C-reactive protein level between 3 and 10 mg/L. Infections were identified by ICD-10 codes in the Danish National Patient Register and ATC-codes in the Danish Prescription Register. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard analysis was used as the statistical model.

RESULTS:

During 53,302 person-years of observation, 571 participants were hospitalized for infection. Similarly, during 26,125 person-years of observation, 7,276 participants filled a prescription of antimicrobials. LGI was associated with increased risk of hospital-based treatment for infection only among men (hazard ratio = 1.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10-2.34) and specifically infections were abscesses and infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissue. Similarly, LGI was associated with the overall use of antimicrobials among men, and particularly with phenoxymethylpenicillin and broad-spectrum antimicrobials for treatment of urinary tract infections. The difference between men and women was not statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

In a large cohort of healthy individuals, LGI was associated with an increased risk of infection among healthy male blood donors.

PMID:
27701463
PMCID:
PMC5049789
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0164220
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center