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Addict Behav. 2017 Feb;65:13-18. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.09.006. Epub 2016 Sep 22.

Correspondence between adolescent and informant reports of substance use: Findings from the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort.

Author information

1
Neuropsychiatry Section, Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce St., 10th Floor, Gates Bldg., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address: jasjones@upenn.edu.
2
Neuropsychiatry Section, Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce St., 10th Floor, Gates Bldg., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; VISN4 Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center, 3900 Woodland Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
3
Neuropsychiatry Section, Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce St., 10th Floor, Gates Bldg., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
4
Neuropsychiatry Section, Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce St., 10th Floor, Gates Bldg., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address: raquel@upenn.edu.

Abstract

Inclusion of collateral informant reports is common in adolescent psychopathology research and clinical assessment, yet few studies have examined agreement on ratings of adolescent substance use or factors that may be associated with reporter agreement. The present study aimed to extend prior work on the correspondence between adolescent and informant reports of adolescent substance use with data from a large (n=5214), diverse, community-based sample of youth aged 11-17 (mean age=14.53, SD=1.98; 52% female). Specifically, we examined: (a) agreement between adolescent and collateral informant reports of adolescent use of alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, inhalants, and stimulants and (b) potential correlates of reporter agreement. Agreement ranged from low (κ=0.007, p=0.053) for inhalant use to moderate (κ=0.414, p<0.001) for marijuana use. Disagreements were mainly driven by collateral underestimation of adolescent substance use. Older adolescent age was associated with poorer agreement across all substances (Odds Ratios [ORs]≤0.80, ps<0.05) except inhalants (OR=1.28, p<0.001). Reporter agreement on alcohol and marijuana use was lower for male than female adolescents (ORs≤0.85, ps<0.05). Adolescent psychopathology was associated with poorer agreement on all substances (ORs≤0.62, ps<0.01). For alcohol and marijuana, past year frequency of use was associated with better reporter agreement (ORs≥1.54, ps<0.001). For marijuana, older age at first use was related to poorer agreement (OR=0.81, p=0.01). Our results suggest that collateral reports of adolescent substance use may be ineffective proxies for adolescent self-reports in community samples, particularly for low base rate substances. Findings also highlight important factors to consider when collecting substance use information from multiple informants.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent substance use; Collateral informants; Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort; Reporter agreement; Substance use assessment

PMID:
27701026
PMCID:
PMC5140708
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.09.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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