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Yale J Biol Med. 2016 Sep 30;89(3):397-422. eCollection 2016 Sep.

Integrative Therapies in Anxiety Treatment with Special Emphasis on the Gut Microbiome.

Author information

1
Laboratories of Molecular Anthropology and Microbiome Research, Department of Anthropology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA.
2
Department of Psychology and Counseling, Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, KS, USA.

Abstract

Over the past decade, research has shown that diet and gut health affects symptoms expressed in stress related disorders, depression, and anxiety through changes in the gut microbiota. Psycho-behavioral function and somatic health interaction have often been ignored in health care with resulting deficits in treatment quality and outcomes. While mental health care requires the professional training in counseling, psychotherapy and psychiatry, complimentary therapeutic strategies, such as attention to a nutritional and diverse diet and supplementation of probiotic foods, may be integrated alongside psychotherapy treatment models. Development of these alternative strategies is predicated on experimental evidence and diligent research on the biology of stress, fear, anxiety-related behaviors, and the gut-brain connection. This article provides a brief overview on biological markers of anxiety and the expanding nutritional literature relating to brain health and mental disorders. A case study demonstrates an example of a biopsychosocial approach integrating cognitive psychotherapy, dietary changes, and mindfulness activities, in treating symptoms of anxiety. This case study shows a possible treatment protocol to explore the efficacy of targeting the gut-brain-axis that may be used as an impetus for future controlled studies.

KEYWORDS:

Nutritional psychiatry; anxiety; behavioral therapy; counseling; depression; enteric nervous system; gut brain axis; mental health; microbiome; neurobiology; stress

PMID:
27698624
PMCID:
PMC5045149
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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