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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 Oct 18;113(42):11973-11978. Epub 2016 Oct 3.

Regulation of MIR165/166 by class II and class III homeodomain leucine zipper proteins establishes leaf polarity.

Author information

1
Developmental Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany.
2
Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, 72076 Tubingen, Germany.
3
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, University of Copenhagen, 1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark; Centre for Plant Molecular Biology, University of Tübingen, 72076 Tubingen, Germany.
4
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, University of Copenhagen, 1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark; Department of Systems Biology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, 120-749 Seodaemoon-gu, Yonsei-ro 50, Seoul, Korea.
5
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, University of Copenhagen, 1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark; Centre for Plant Molecular Biology, University of Tübingen, 72076 Tubingen, Germany; heisler@embl.de wenkel@plen.ku.dk.
6
Developmental Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany; School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia heisler@embl.de wenkel@plen.ku.dk.

Abstract

A defining feature of plant leaves is their flattened shape. This shape depends on an antagonism between the genes that specify adaxial (top) and abaxial (bottom) tissue identity; however, the molecular nature of this antagonism remains poorly understood. Class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) transcription factors are key mediators in the regulation of adaxial-abaxial patterning. Their expression is restricted adaxially during early development by the abaxially expressed microRNA (MIR)165/166, yet the mechanism that restricts MIR165/166 expression to abaxial leaf tissues remains unknown. Here, we show that class III and class II HD-ZIP proteins act together to repress MIR165/166 via a conserved cis-element in their promoters. Organ morphology and tissue patterning in plants, therefore, depend on a bidirectional repressive circuit involving a set of miRNAs and its targets.

KEYWORDS:

MIR165/166; class II HD-ZIP; class III HD-ZIP; leaf morphogenesis; organ patterning

PMID:
27698117
PMCID:
PMC5081595
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1516110113
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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