Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neurosci Bull. 2016 Dec;32(6):591-596. Epub 2016 Oct 1.

Long-Term Cognitive Improvement After Benfotiamine Administration in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Zhongshan Hospital, State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology, Institutes of Brain Science and Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China.
2
PET Center, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200443, China.
3
Department of Neurology, Zhongshan Hospital, State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology, Institutes of Brain Science and Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China. zhongcj@163.com.

Abstract

To date, we still lack disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we report that long-term administration of benfotiamine improved the cognitive ability of patients with AD. Five patients with mild to moderate AD received oral benfotiamine (300 mg daily) over 18 months. All patients were examined by positron emission tomography with Pittsburgh compound B (PiB-PET) and exhibited positive imaging with β-amyloid deposition, and three received PiB-PET imaging at follow-up. The five patients exhibited cognitive improvement as assayed by the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) with an average increase of 3.2 points at month 18 of benfotiamine administration. The three patients who received follow-up PiB-PET had a 36.7% increase in the average standardized uptake value ratio in the brain compared with that in the first scan. Importantly, the MMSE scores of these three had an average increase of 3 points during the same period. Benfotiamine significantly improved the cognitive abilities of mild to moderate AD patients independently of brain amyloid accumulation. Our study provides new insight to the development of disease-modifying therapy.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; Amyloid deposition; Benfotiamine; PiB-PET; Therapy

PMID:
27696179
PMCID:
PMC5567484
DOI:
10.1007/s12264-016-0067-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center