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Front Psychol. 2016 Sep 15;7:1396. eCollection 2016.

The Effect of Number and Presentation Order of High-Constraint Sentences on Second Language Word Learning.

Author information

1
Beijing Key Laboratory of Applied Experimental Psychology, School of Psychology, Beijing Normal UniversityBeijing, China; State Key Lab of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal UniversityBeijing, China; Department of Education Management, School of Education, The Open University of ChinaBeijing, China.
2
Beijing Key Laboratory of Applied Experimental Psychology, School of Psychology, Beijing Normal University Beijing, China.
3
Children's Learning Institute, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Houston, TX, USA.
4
Beijing Key Laboratory of Applied Experimental Psychology, School of Psychology, Beijing Normal UniversityBeijing, China; State Key Lab of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal UniversityBeijing, China.

Abstract

This paper presents the results of an experiment that investigated the effects of number and presentation order of high-constraint sentences on semantic processing of unknown second language (L2) words (pseudowords) through reading. All participants were Chinese native speakers who learned English as a foreign language. In the experiment, sentence constraint and order of different constraint sentences were manipulated in English sentences, as well as L2 proficiency level of participants. We found that the number of high-constraint sentences was supportive for L2 word learning except in the condition in which high-constraint exposure was presented first. Moreover, when the number of high-constraint sentences was the same, learning was significantly better when the first exposure was a high-constraint exposure. And no proficiency level effects were found. Our results provided direct evidence that L2 word learning benefited from high quality language input and first presentations of high quality language input.

KEYWORDS:

presentation order; reading; second language; sentence constraint; word learning

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