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Nat Rev Microbiol. 2017 Jan;15(1):55-63. doi: 10.1038/nrmicro.2016.142. Epub 2016 Oct 3.

Emerging pathogenic links between microbiota and the gut-lung axis.

Author information

1
Priority Research Centre for Healthy Lungs, University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, New South Wales 2305, Australia.
2
Australian Centre for Ecogenomics, School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia.
3
Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia.
4
The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia.
5
Australian Centre for Ecogenomics, School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, and the Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia; and The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Woolloongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia.

Abstract

The microbiota is vital for the development of the immune system and homeostasis. Changes in microbial composition and function, termed dysbiosis, in the respiratory tract and the gut have recently been linked to alterations in immune responses and to disease development in the lungs. In this Opinion article, we review the microbial species that are usually found in healthy gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, their dysbiosis in disease and interactions with the gut-lung axis. Although the gut-lung axis is only beginning to be understood, emerging evidence indicates that there is potential for manipulation of the gut microbiota in the treatment of lung diseases.

PMID:
27694885
DOI:
10.1038/nrmicro.2016.142
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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