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Early Hum Dev. 2016 Dec;103:167-174. doi: 10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2016.09.010. Epub 2016 Sep 28.

Early determinants of vagal activity at preschool age - With potential dependence on sex.

Author information

1
Mannheim Institute of Public Health, Social and Preventive Medicine, University Medicine Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
2
Mannheim Institute of Public Health, Social and Preventive Medicine, University Medicine Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany; Instituto de Saúde Coletiva, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil.
3
Mannheim Institute of Public Health, Social and Preventive Medicine, University Medicine Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany; Department of General Pediatrics, University Medicine Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany. Electronic address: freia.debock@medma.uni-heidelberg.de.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In children, autonomic nervous function is related to various highly prevalent health problems and might therefore represent an early indicator of ill health.

AIMS:

We aimed to investigate the role of early-life exposures and physical activity (PA) as potential determinants of autonomic function at preschool age.

STUDY DESIGN AND SUBJECTS:

We used an existing longitudinal data set of repeated vagal tone measurements (assessed via heart rate recovery (HRR)) and retrospectively assessed early-life exposures in 1052 children (mean age: 59.4months, 47.5% girls) from 52 preschools in Germany recruited from 2008 to 2010.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

HRR 1min after submaximal exercise served as primary outcome. Through multilevel linear regression analysis adjusted for demographic and socioeconomic factors, we assessed the association between repeatedly measured HRR and pregnancy smoking status, breastfeeding and objectively measured PA.

RESULTS:

Besides significant regression coefficients for previously described correlates of HRR (sex, age), we could show positive associations of HRR with breastfeeding (six versus zero months: +4.2 beats per minute (BPM), p=0.004) and PA (+1.0BPM for 10min increase of moderate-to-vigorous PA/day, p<0.001). Smoking before and during pregnancy showed no significant association with HRR in the total sample. However, we found interactions between sex and smoking before and during pregnancy as well as between sex and breastfeeding, suggesting significant associations with HRR only in girls.

CONCLUSIONS:

Besides PA, early pre- and postnatal exposures seem to have long-lasting effects on children's autonomic function, still recordable at preschool age. Our data suggest that these effects might be sex-dependent.

KEYWORDS:

Autonomic nervous system; Child preschool; Early-life programming; Heart rate recovery; Sex

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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