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EBioMedicine. 2016 Oct;12:170-177. doi: 10.1016/j.ebiom.2016.09.022. Epub 2016 Sep 23.

Characterization of a 2016 Clinical Isolate of Zika Virus in Non-human Primates.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing 100071, China.
2
Laboratory Animal Center, Academy of Military Medical Science, Beijing 100071, China.
3
State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing 100071, China; Guangxi Medical University, Xining 530021, China.
4
Guangzhou Eighth People's Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China.
5
CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
6
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology & Molecular Biophysics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA.
7
State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing 100071, China; Guangxi Medical University, Xining 530021, China. Electronic address: qincf@bmi.ac.cn.

Abstract

Animal models are critical to understand disease and to develop countermeasures for the ongoing epidemics of Zika virus (ZIKV). Here we report a non-human primate model using a 2016 contemporary clinical isolate of ZIKV. Upon subcutaneous inoculation, rhesus macaques developed fever and viremia, with robust excretion of ZIKV RNA in urine, saliva, and lacrimal fluid. Necropsy of two infected animals revealed that systematic infections involving central nervous system and visceral organs were established at the acute phrase. ZIKV initially targeted the intestinal tracts, spleen, and parotid glands, and retained in spleen and lymph nodes till 10days post infection. ZIKV-specific immune responses were readily induced in all inoculated animals. The non-human primate model described here provides a valuable platform to study ZIKV pathogenesis and to evaluate vaccine and therapeutics.

KEYWORDS:

Lacrimal fluid; Non-human primate model; Target organ; Zika virus

PMID:
27693104
PMCID:
PMC5078627
DOI:
10.1016/j.ebiom.2016.09.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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