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Reprod Biol. 2016 Dec;16(4):243-254. doi: 10.1016/j.repbio.2016.09.001. Epub 2016 Sep 28.

Impact of endocrine disrupting chemicals on onset and development of female reproductive disorders and hormone-related cancer.

Author information

1
Institute of Experimental Endocrinology, Biomedical Research Center, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 05 Bratislava, Slovakia. Electronic address: sona.scsukova@hotmail.com.
2
Department of Toxicology and Faculty of Medicine, Faculty of Public Health, Slovak Medical University, Limbova 12, 833 03 Bratislava, Slovakia.
3
Institute of Experimental Endocrinology, Biomedical Research Center, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 05 Bratislava, Slovakia.

Abstract

A growing body of evidence suggests that exposure to chemical substances designated as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) due to their ability to disturb endocrine (hormonal) activity in humans and animals, may contribute to problems with fertility, pregnancy, and other aspects of reproduction. The presence of EDCs has already been associated with reproductive malfunction in wildlife species, but it remains difficult to prove causal relationships between the presence of EDCs and specific reproductive problems in vivo, especially in females. On the other hand, the increasing number of experiments with laboratory animals and in vitro research indicate the ability of different EDCs to influence the normal function of female reproductive system, and even their association with cancer development or progression. Research shows that EDCs may pose the greatest risk during prenatal and early postnatal development when organ and neural systems are forming. In this review article, we aim to point out a possible contribution of EDCs to the onset and development of female reproductive disorders and endocrine-related cancers with regard to the period of exposure to EDCs and affected endpoints (organs or processes).

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Development; Endocrine disrupting chemicals; Females; Reproductive disorders

PMID:
27692877
DOI:
10.1016/j.repbio.2016.09.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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