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Am J Infect Control. 2016 Dec 1;44(12):1565-1571. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2016.07.007. Epub 2016 Sep 28.

Reduced health care-associated infections in an acute care community hospital using a combination of self-disinfecting copper-impregnated composite hard surfaces and linens.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases & International Health, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA; Office of Hospital Epidemiology/Infection Prevention & Control, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA. Electronic address: csifri@virginia.edu.
2
Sentara Healthcare, Norfolk, VA.
3
Office of Hospital Epidemiology/Infection Prevention & Control, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA; Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of copper-impregnated composite hard surfaces and linens in an acute care hospital to reduce health care-associated infections (HAIs).

METHODS:

We performed a quasiexperimental study with a control group, assessing development of HAIs due to multidrug resistant organisms (MDROs) and Clostridium difficile in the acute care units of a community hospital following the replacement of a 1970s-era clinical wing with a new wing outfitted with copper-impregnated composite hard surfaces and linens.

RESULTS:

The study was conducted over a 25.5-month time period that included a 3.5-month washout period. HAI rates obtained from the copper-containing new hospital wing (14,479 patient-days; 72 beds) and the unmodified hospital wing (19,177 patient-days) were compared with those from the baseline period (46,391 patient-days). The new wing had 78% (P = .023) fewer HAIs due to MDROs or C difficile, 83% (P = .048) fewer cases of C difficile infection, and 68% (P = .252) fewer infections due to MDROs relative to the baseline period. No changes in rates of HAI were observed in the unmodified hospital wing.

CONCLUSIONS:

Copper-impregnated composite hard surfaces and linens may be useful technologies to prevent HAIs in acute care hospital settings. Additional studies are needed to determine whether reduced HAIs can be attributed to the use of copper-containing antimicrobial hard and soft surfaces.

KEYWORDS:

Antimicrobial surfaces; Antimicrobial textiles; Clostridium difficile; Contact killing

PMID:
27692785
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajic.2016.07.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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