Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Otolaryngol. 2016 Nov - Dec;37(6):563-566. doi: 10.1016/j.amjoto.2016.08.004. Epub 2016 Aug 12.

A 14-year-old boy with extranodal natural killer cell lymphoma of the nose, nasopharynx, larynx, and trachea in remission 6years after primary diagnosis. A longitudinal case report.

Author information

1
Pediatric Otolaryngology, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery and Department of Pediatrics, LSUHSC-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, United States. Electronic address: entforkids@yahoo.com.
2
PGY 5 Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, LSUHSC-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, United States.
3
Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, OH, United States.
4
Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, LSUHSC-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, United States.

Abstract

Nasal type extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL) is a rare lymphoma in the USA and Europe but endemic in East Asia and in areas of South and Central America. Clinically natural killer cell lymphomas are divided into three categories; nasal, non-nasal and aggressive lymphoma/leukemia subtypes. ENKTL, nasal type occurs in the nose and can extend to the upper aero-digestive tract as reported in this longitudinal case study. This is a longitudinal report of progress of a 14-year-old boy with ENKTL originating in the nasal cavity with subsequent extension and recurrence in the contralateral nose, nasopharynx, larynx and trachea presenting with varying degrees of respiratory problems and eventually, respiratory distress. Caregiver refusal of stem cell transplantation prompted an alternative diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Clinical course with recurrences, extensions and remissions over 6years with tailored endoscopic surgical treatment and radiochemotherapy is documented to present a guide in the multidisciplinary management of this rare disease.

PMID:
27692503
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjoto.2016.08.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center