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  • PMID: 27692052 was deleted because it is a duplicate of PMID: 28364449
Sleep. 2017 Jan 1;40(1). doi: 10.1093/sleep/zsw009.

Modeling Neurocognitive Decline and Recovery During Repeated Cycles of Extended Sleep and Chronic Sleep Deficiency.

Author information

1
Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.
2
Department of Medicine, Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
3
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Study Objectives:

Intraindividual night-to-night sleep duration is often insufficient and variable. Here we report the effects of such chronic variable sleep deficiency on neurobehavioral performance and the ability of state-of-the-art models to predict these changes.

Methods:

Eight healthy males (mean age ± SD: 23.9 ± 2.4 years) studied at our inpatient intensive physiologic monitoring unit completed an 11-day protocol with a baseline 10-hour sleep opportunity and three cycles of two 3-hour time-in-bed (TIB) and one 10-hour TIB sleep opportunities. Participants received one of three polychromatic white light interventions (200 lux 4100K, 200 or 400 lux 17000K) for 3.5 hours on the morning following the second 3-hour TIB opportunity each cycle. Neurocognitive performance was assessed using the psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) administered every 1-2 hours. PVT data were compared to predictions of five group-average mathematical models that incorporate chronic sleep loss functions.

Results:

While PVT performance deteriorated cumulatively following each cycle of two 3-hour sleep opportunities, and improved following each 10-hour sleep opportunity, performance declined cumulatively throughout the protocol at a more accelerated rate than predicted by state-of-the-art group-average mathematical models. Subjective sleepiness did not reflect performance. The light interventions had minimal effect.

Conclusions:

Despite apparent recovery following each extended sleep opportunity, residual performance impairment remained and deteriorated rapidly when rechallenged with subsequent sleep loss. None of the group-average models were capable of predicting both the build-up in impairment and recovery profile of performance observed at the group or individual level, raising concerns regarding their use in real-world settings to predict performance and improve safety.

KEYWORDS:

chronic variable sleep deficiency; neurobehavioral performance; physiological adaptation; recovery of function.; recovery sleep; subjective sleepiness

PMID:
28364449
DOI:
10.1093/sleep/zsw009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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