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J Natl Cancer Inst. 2016 Sep 28;109(2). doi: 10.1093/jnci/djw201. Print 2017 Feb.

Biospecimen Sharing Among Hispanic Women in a Safety-Net Clinic: Implications for the Precision Medicine Initiative.

Author information

1
Moores Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
2
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
3
Department of Surgery, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
4
Department of Biomedical Informatics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.

Abstract

Biospecimen donation is key to the Precision Medicine Initiative, which pioneers a model for accelerating biomedical research through individualized care. Personalized medicine should be made available to medically underserved populations, including the large and growing US Hispanic population. We present results of a study of 140 Hispanic women who underwent a breast biopsy at a safety-net hospital and were randomly assigned to receive information and request for consent for biospecimen and data sharing by the patient's physician or a research assistant. Consent rates were high (97.1% and 92.9% in the physician and research assistant arms, respectively) and not different between groups (relative risk [RR] = 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.96 to 1.10). Consistent with a small but growing literature, we show that perceptions of Hispanics' unwillingness to participate in biospecimen sharing for research are not supported by data. Safety-net clinics and hospitals offer untapped possibilities for enhancing participation of underserved populations in the exciting Precision Medicine Initiative.

PMID:
27688295
PMCID:
PMC5040829
DOI:
10.1093/jnci/djw201
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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