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J Clin Anesth. 2016 Nov;34:623-31. doi: 10.1016/j.jclinane.2016.06.015. Epub 2016 Aug 2.

National Survey of US academic anesthesiology chairs on clinician wellness.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115. Electronic address: amy.vinson@childrens.harvard.edu.
2
Departments of Anesthesia and Surgery, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115. Electronic address: David.Zurakowski@childrens.harvard.edu.
3
Department of Anesthesiology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 251 E Huron St, F5-704, Chicago, IL 60611. Electronic address: g-randel@northwestern.edu.
4
Department of Anesthesiology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, 2200 N Squirrel Rd, Rochester, MI 48309. Electronic address: 2kschlecht@comcast.net.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

The prevalence of anesthesiology department wellness programs is unknown. A database of wellness programs is needed as a resource for departments attempting to respond to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Anesthesiology Milestones Project. The purpose of this study was to survey academic anesthesiology chairs on wellness issues, characterize initiatives, and establish wellness contacts for a Wellness Initiative Database (WID).

DESIGN:

An Internet-based survey instrument was distributed to academic anesthesiology department chairs in the United States.

SETTING:

On-line.

PATIENTS:

None.

INTERVENTIONS:

None.

MEASUREMENTS:

Analysis for continuous variables used standard means, modes, and averages for individual responses; 95% confidence intervals for proportions were calculated by Wilson's method.

MAIN RESULTS:

Seventy-five (56.4%) responses (of a potential 133 programs) were obtained. Forty-one (of 71 responders; 57.8%) expressed interest in participating in a WID, and 33 (44%) provided contact information. Most (74.7%) had recently referred staff for counseling or wellness resources, yet many (79.5% and 67.1%, respectively) had never surveyed their department's interest in wellness resources. Thirty-four percent had a wellness resources repository. Of 22 wellness topics, 8 garnered >60% strong interest from respondents: Addiction Counseling, Sleep Hygiene, Peer Support Program, Stress Management, Conflict Management, Burnout Counseling, Time Management, and Dealing with Adverse Events Training. There was a statistically significant difference in interest between those willing to participate or not in the WID across most topics but no significant difference based on need for recent staff referral.

CONCLUSIONS:

The majority of chairs needed to recently refer a department member to wellness resources or counseling. Most were interested in participating in a WID, whereas a minority had gauged staff interest in wellness topics or had a wellness resource repository. Highest interest was in topics most related to function as an anesthesiologist. Those willing to participate in the database had statistically significant differences in interest across most wellness topics.

KEYWORDS:

Burnout, professional; Education, medical, graduate; Surveys and questionnaires; Wellness programs

PMID:
27687461
DOI:
10.1016/j.jclinane.2016.06.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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